Month: February 2018

Shameless Plugs Podcast

Shameless Plugs Podcast

J.A. George and Samantha the Writer discuss reading, writing and pop culture – and shamelessly plug their own writing. — Read on www.shamelessplugspodcast.com/ This week’s special guest: me I talk about the blog, why I do it, and my upcoming project.

Optimize PDF Planner Stickers for Cricut Design Space

Optimize PDF Planner Stickers for Cricut Design Space

How to optimize free PDF planner stickers for use in Cricut Design Space using Photoshop Elements.

March Planner Stickers

March Planner Stickers

It’s time for more free planner stickers!

Remember, these are cricut files. If you have cricut access, then you just need to print then cut. If you need the layout pages or more detailed instructions click the links

March 1

The end of winter. I love animals celebrating.

Free Cricut planner stickers-www.themanuscriptshredder.com

March 2

Getting ready for those rainy days
Free Cricut planner stickers-www.themanuscriptshredder.com

March 3

I love the pale greens or early spring.

Free Cricut Planner Stickers-www.themanuscriptshredder.com

March 4

So ready for warmer weather

Free Cricut planner stickers-www.themanuscriptshredder.com

Happy Spring Everyone!

World-building: why sprinkles don’t work-author toolbox

World-building: why sprinkles don’t work-author toolbox

Just chopping info-dumps into smaller pieces isn’t really that sneaky. The savvy reader will still sense that something isn’t right. Sprinkling world-building randomly into your story is like tossing skittles on top of your tiramisu. It doesn’t solve the real problem. Fortunately, there is a better way

Novel Revision and Editing Guide

Novel Revision and Editing Guide

Revising without a plan can lead to hours of wasted effort and frustration. Rather than getting stuck in an endless editing loop, use this novel revision and editing guide to make sure you are doing the right edits in the right order

Why I Write Fantasy-IWSG

Why I Write Fantasy-IWSG

Why I Write Fantasy

This is my first post on the blog hop The Insecure Writers Support Group: a monthly blog hop therapy group for writers.

(If you’re here for my writing lessons and have no need for this warm-fuzzy-feeling stuff, I’ll see you on Friday.)

Co-hosts for the February 7 posting of the IWSG are Stephen Tremp, Pat Garcia, Angela Wooldridge, Victoria Marie Lees, and Madeline Mora-Summonte.

If you’d like to sign up click here

February 7 question – What do you love about the genre you write in most often?

Why I write Fantasy

WHY I WRITE FANTASY-www.themanuscriptshredder.comWhen I was young, fantasy novels were a way to escape. The adolescent mind rebelling against some perceived injustice. The sense of wrongness in the world that I had no word for, just the driving need to escape. I read all kinds of fantasy because anywhere was better than here.

In my teen years, the nameless repression began to identify itself as the message of my “true” role in life became apparent. I fled to fantasy. Whether it was Star Trek or Dungeons and Dragons, fantasy was a place where female characters weren’t penalized. I didn’t care if my heroines fought with swords, magic, or phasers. They could fight. Anywhere was better than here.

As an adult, I began teaching in an urban school in a poor neighborhood. I watched my students do incredible things despite the struggles of poverty, and I thought, “If only they were living somewhere where they didn’t have these problems.” Surely, anywhere was better than here.

Then I moved to a wealthy suburban district and watched the students there struggle not under the weight of poverty but of impossible expectations. I saw this at every school I taught. Every background, every race, every environment. No matter where I went, my students had the same needs, the same hopes. Only the monsters changed.

This is what fantasy does. It illustrates what is common to all people. By telling stories in cultures that do not exist, it strips away the reader’s preconceptions and politics. By changing these rules, those biases no longer affect the reader’s experience. This leaves readers only the shared human experience. The basic needs that unite us: shelter, safety, belonging, and self-expression are present no matter how foreign the setting.

Fantasy allows us to drop the expectation and biases of our own culture in favor of the common human experience. Fantasy isn’t about escaping. It’s about examining what is common to all human experience. The buildings may be different, but people are all the same. This is why I love fantasy and why fantasy is so important.

Fantasy shows us that everywhere is here.

Thanks for reading,
M.L. Keller

To continue on the blog hop

 

The Magic Fix-it Scene

The Magic Fix-it Scene

Adding material to your manuscript to solve a problem? The magic fix-it scene rarely works. While these scenes are intended to solve a specific problem, they often cause a host of other issues. But there is a better way


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